Reblogging Addiction

Impart your wisdom in words   I change my intro with every passing season. Now I haven't the time to write as much so darkness is scarce. I find myself in the occasional rant in here, forgetting as usual what my previous great idea had been all too soon.

Let's say, I don't have the mental fortitude, or strictness others seem to display. In temperament and mind, I am the wind, changing direction with every second. Oh sure there's a basic theme, "What I like", but today that will be different than tomorrow. You'd think by now, I would have defined my tired soul in one direction. But no. I cannot, will not be held down to one theme. That is not who I want to be, though I envy the ability to be so sure of oneself. I will never define who I am, or what I'm capable of, or limit my desires. So in recommitting to the cause, I rededicate Myself to being Myself.
I am not perfect, but that makes me perfectly happy. Mediocre, and happy. Depressed and lonely a lot. Silly and childish, naive and playful. Easy to smile, and faster to anger. Tired of things that don't make sense. Ready to learn and ready to rest from it all. Loving the day, but even more so the night.

twitter.com/momentsinbtwn:

    "A man who is certain he is right is almost sure to be wrong."
    Michael Faraday, renown 19th century scientist (via whats-out-there)
    — 1 day ago with 261 notes
    #whats-out-there 

    Life’s a beach for National Dog Day :)

    — 2 days ago
    #national dog day  #josie  #josietakesawalk 
    humansofnewyork:

"I want to be a pilot.""What will be the hardest part about being a pilot?""When the plane crashes."(Nairobi, Kenya)

    humansofnewyork:

    "I want to be a pilot."
    "What will be the hardest part about being a pilot?"
    "When the plane crashes."

    (Nairobi, Kenya)

    — 2 days ago with 3212 notes
    #hony  #nairobi  #kenya  #its the sudden stop that's funny 
    gandalf1202:

James Jacques Joseph Tissot - Hide and Seek [c.1877] on Flickr.In early 1874 Degas wrote, “Look here, my dear Tissot… you positively must exhibit at the Boulevard [in the first impressionist exhibition]… Exhibit. Be of your country and with your friends.” Degas and Tissot, who met as students during the late 1850s, stayed in close communication even after Tissot fled to London in 1871 to avoid punishment for activities in the abortive Commune. Arguing that the benefits of declaring his allegiance to French art outweighed the potential harm it might cause among Tissot’s London audience, Degas urged Tissot to show with the impressionists and thereby affirm his ties to France and more particularly to Degas and realism.
Although he chose not to accept the invitation, Tissot, like Degas, worked in a realist vein. Hide and Seek depicts a modern, opulently cluttered Victorian room, Tissot’s studio. After Kathleen Newton entered his home in about 1876, Tissot focused almost exclusively on intimate, anecdotal descriptions of the activities of the secluded suburban household, depicting an idyllic world tinged by a melancholy awareness of the illness that would lead to her death in 1882. The artist’s companion reads in a corner as her nieces and daughter amuse themselves. The artist injected an atmosphere of unease into this tranquil scene by comparing the three lively faces peering toward the infant in the foreground at the left with an ashen Japanese mask hanging near Mrs. Newton in the entry to the conservatory.
[National Gallery of Art, Washington - Oil on wood, 73.4 x 53.9 cm]

    gandalf1202:

    James Jacques Joseph Tissot - Hide and Seek [c.1877] on Flickr.

    In early 1874 Degas wrote, “Look here, my dear Tissot… you positively must exhibit at the Boulevard [in the first impressionist exhibition]… Exhibit. Be of your country and with your friends.” Degas and Tissot, who met as students during the late 1850s, stayed in close communication even after Tissot fled to London in 1871 to avoid punishment for activities in the abortive Commune. Arguing that the benefits of declaring his allegiance to French art outweighed the potential harm it might cause among Tissot’s London audience, Degas urged Tissot to show with the impressionists and thereby affirm his ties to France and more particularly to Degas and realism.

    Although he chose not to accept the invitation, Tissot, like Degas, worked in a realist vein. Hide and Seek depicts a modern, opulently cluttered Victorian room, Tissot’s studio. After Kathleen Newton entered his home in about 1876, Tissot focused almost exclusively on intimate, anecdotal descriptions of the activities of the secluded suburban household, depicting an idyllic world tinged by a melancholy awareness of the illness that would lead to her death in 1882. The artist’s companion reads in a corner as her nieces and daughter amuse themselves. The artist injected an atmosphere of unease into this tranquil scene by comparing the three lively faces peering toward the infant in the foreground at the left with an ashen Japanese mask hanging near Mrs. Newton in the entry to the conservatory.

    [National Gallery of Art, Washington - Oil on wood, 73.4 x 53.9 cm]

    (via lies)

    — 3 days ago with 38 notes
    #tissot  #my best friend was degas  #peek-a-boo